Rotary's Purple Pinkie Day Reminds Everyone of the Seriousness of Polio | Community Spirit

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Rotary's Purple Pinkie Day Reminds Everyone of the Seriousness of Polio
Rotary's Purple Pinkie Day Reminds Everyone of the Seriousness of Polio

There is no cure for polio.  It is still crippling and killing people in Nigeria, India, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Rotarians around the world go on NID's (National Immunization Days) to vaccinate children in countries where polio is still present. They place two pink drops of vaccine on the tongues of children under 5 and then paint their little pinkies purple so they will know who they have vaccinated. Since 1985 Rotarians have vaccinated over 2 billion children. The cost to vaccinate a child is just $1.00.

Purple Pinkie Day is the way the Bethel Rotary shows the children of the area that polio is still a problem in the world.  On Wednesday, April 13 all the children in the area's elementary schools will bring in their dollars so that they can be part of helping other children in the world. For every dollar they bring they get a finger painted by local Rotarians. (Every child will get a pinkie painted as money has been donated for any who could not afford a dollar.)  "Painting" begins at Crescent Park starting at 8:30am, at Andover at 10:30am and at Woodstock at 12:30pm.

A Celebration assembly will be held at Crescent Park at 1:30pm where children will show off their newly painted pinkies as they sing "We Are the World".  A special speaker for the day will be Ann Lee Hussey, The Rotary 7780 Governor. She is very charismatic and is also a survivor of polio. She also has post polio syndrome which makes walking difficult for her.  Ann Lee will also speak to Telstar high school students sometime on the morning of April 13 (Time to be determined). When introduced to the Purple Pinkie project, the elementary students were extremely excited about being a part of this world event. 

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